Did the Princetonians Neglect the Human Character of Scripture?

Did the Princetonians Neglect the Human Character of Scripture?

Here is an overlooked paragraph from Hodge and Warfield’s 1881 essay on “Inspiration“:

It must be remembered that it is not claimed that the Scriptures, any more than their authors, are omniscient. The information they convey is in the forms of human thought, and limited on all sides. They were not designed to teach philosophy, science or human history as such. They were not designed to furnish an infallible system of speculative theology. They are written in human languages, whose words, inflections, constructions and idioms bear everywhere indelible traces of human error. The record itself furnishes evidence that the writers were in large measure dependent for the their knowledge upon sources and methods in themselves fallible, and that their personal knowledge and judgments were in many matters hesitating and defective, or even wrong. Nevertheless, the historical faith of the Church has always been that all the affirmations of Scripture of all kinds, whether of spiritual doctrine or duty, or of physical or historical fact, or of psychological or physical principle, are without error when the ipsissima verba of the original autographs are ascertained and interpreted in their natural and intended sense.

from Justin Taylor See it at: http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/justintaylor/2013/01/31/did-the-princetonians-neglect-the-human-character-of-scripture/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+between2worlds+%28Between+Two+Worlds%29

Advertisements

About alialonso

I am Youth Pastor and mDiv student at Reformed Theological Seminary in Central Florida. Together with my lovely wife, Claudia, and our Yorkie, Toshii, we are desire to glorify God and serve the local church by creating heart-felt and Biblically informed worshippers of love for God.

Posted on February 1, 2013, in Uncategorized and tagged , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: